Working together for a sustainable future
We can help you make your products and processes greener and more efficient. For several years Sandvik Coromant has been developing a code of conduct for environmental, health and safety management systems. An important part of that is a new life-cycle approach we apply when purchasing and collecting your worn tools so they can be reconditioned or recycled. This process saves both parties energy and reduces carbon dioxide emissions.​

 

 



Making money on used carbide

On top of saving money, recycling was important to a US car parts and accessories manufacturer. Sandvik Coromant implemented a new carbide recycling program and was able to refund the customer 2-4% of its yearly carbide purchases.

Sustainable and profitable

 
Energy saving program in Japan

After the Fukushima nuclear disaster, Sandvik Coromant launched a program to reduce energy consumption by 15 percent in tool-cutting processes.

Tsunami eliminated cheap energy for metalworking in Japan

 
Scrap material turned into huge savings

Recycling carbide is not only good for the environment – it is also good for your business. You might be sitting on scrap material worth tens of thousands of dollars.

The value in recycling

 

This is how our solid carbide recovery works

This is how our solid carbide recovery works
Did you know that 95 percent of a used carbide insert can be recycled?
Read about our recycling program that turns your worn-out tools into a source of income
 

The value of recycling

The value of recycling

A new carbide recycling program by Sandvik Coromant create sustainable and efficient solution for a US car parts and accessories manufacturer.

Making money on used carbide

 

Safety and savings – hand in hand

Safety and savings – hand in hand

Sandvik Coromant replaced a critical machine at a Brazilian manufacturer of engine blocks, leading to big savings and a closer business relationship.

New solution boosts productivity

 

The profitable business of CSR

The profitable business of CSR

In the last 20 years, CSR has matured from a charitable notion to a strategic necessity. The next step is to make sustainability and responsibility natural outcomes of business activity.

This is CSR 2.0


Percent of respondents from a 2012 company survey that said they had changed their business model to incorporate sustainability, up from 40 percent in 2011.

Source: MIT Sloan's 2012 Sustainability Executive Study